Take a selfie from SPACE! Free Spelfie app uses satellite cameras 400 miles above the Earth to take photos of users

  • Spelfie connects to cameras on Airbus Earth-observation satellites 
  • It locates the user and snaps a ‘selfie’ from more than 400 miles above Earth
  • The app is designed t
  • o capture large events like sports or protests 
Take a selfie from SPACE! Free Spelfie app uses satellite cameras 400 miles above the Earth to take photos of users

A new app lets you take a selfie that is out-of-this-world.
Called Spelfie, the technology snaps pictures from over 400 miles above Earth using cameras aboard Airbus Earth-observation satellites. The images will not show a close up of the user’s face, but is designed to capture a large group at an event such as a sports or environmental protest.

The world’s first selfie taken from space was revealed in a BBC documentary earlier this week. A group of activists campaigning against plastic pollution on the island of Bali in Asia spelled out ‘ACT NOW’ on a polluted beach in a movement called Bye Bye Plastic Bags.

Isabel Wijsen, one of the activists, used Spelfie to snap a picture of the display, which highlighters her exact location as the camera peers down to Earth through a haze of clouds.

 Spelfie snaps pictures of from over 400 miles above Earth using cameras aboard Airbus Earth-observation satellites. The images will not show a close up of the user’s face, but is designed to capture a large group at an event such as a sports or environmental protest

Spelfie snaps pictures of from over 400 miles above Earth using cameras aboard Airbus Earth-observation satellites. The images will not show a close up of the user’s face, but is designed to capture a large group at an event such as a sports or environmental protest

Users confirm an event to attend in the app, which is free to download – events are created by outside partners and sponsors. They then take a selfie at the designated time and place and wait for their Spelfie to land from space on the same day.

Spelfie CEO Chris Newlands said: ‘Spelfie is a movement of people who want to change the world and make a difference through social media and imagery.’ ‘The power of a Spelfie can help raise awareness globally, encouraging others to join in and want to make a difference too just as Isabel did for the Bye Bye Plastic Bags movement in Bali.’

Isabel Wijsen (pictured), one of the activists, used Spelfie to snap a picture of the display, which highlighters her exact location as the camera peers down to Earth through a haze of clouds


Isabel Wijsen (pictured), one of the activists, used Spelfie to snap a picture of the display, which highlighters her exact location as the camera peers down to Earth through a haze of clouds

Airbus has almost 50 Earth observation satellites circling our planet, which use optical cameras to pierce through clouds and snap high quality images

Airbus has almost 50 Earth observation satellites circling our planet, which use optical cameras to pierce through clouds and snap high quality images. And it uses its fleet to capture images of many environmental challenges that society faces today including deforestation, natural disasters such as fires, floods and drought, and pollution monitoring.

Airbus recently revealed its concept for a new satellite to monitor space weather and predict when burst of energy will spew from the sun. The Lagrange satellite will follow the Earth along its orbit, maintaining a view on the side of the side of the Sun that is about to rotate into the view of the Earth. Bursts of charged particles and magnetic fields from the Sun form the so-called space weather. Peaks in the solar wind have the potential to interfere with both orbiting satellites and Earth-based communications technologies and even power grids. High-energy solar storms have the potential to cause billions of pounds of economic damage if, for example, they took out our satellite-based navigation systems.

The most powerful discharges come in eruptions called ‘coronal mass ejections’ (CMEs), which expel billions of tons of charged particles bound in magnetic fields that can be larger than the Earth itself.

ORIGINAL SOURCE

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